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Thread: Atlantis, myth or truly lost city

  1. #1
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    Y Ddraig Goch Guest

    Default Atlantis, myth or truly lost city

    you opinons on this topic please.

  2. #2
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    Y Ddraig Goch Guest

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    i have read about the lemurians too. but there are just too many speculations of the whereabouts of atlantis. and is Mu by any chance same as Atlantis ??? for what i know Mu is the lost kingdom from chinese mythology or some of the other eastern asian nations, dont know which one precisely.

  3. #3
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    Y Ddraig Goch Guest

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    well i have also read that Mu is also a sunken civilization. that's why i mentioned it.

  4. #4
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    redhand Guest

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    When I think about this I am reminded of the occult writings of James Churchward and his theories about what he called "The Lost Continent of Mu". I always found the idea interesting true or not but, there are many unexplained things that are found around the world that may be a part of this mystery, to make it true.

  5. #5
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    redhand Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vir Sapiens View Post
    One of my favorite bits of "supporting evidence" for Mu has been the Moai. Anthropologists think they know what happened to the Moai makers now. They think that at one time Easter Island was covered in forests and su pported a rather diverse eco system. The Moai makers kept cutting down the trees to make rollers to move the Moai to the shore line until eventually they cut down the entire forest. With no more forest the ecosystem was devestated and the island no longer became habitabal for lack of food.

    It's less fun than having the Moai built by Lemurians or their ancestors, but amusing none the less.
    Yes, If the Africa-origins thinkers traced the beginning of their theory to the fiery demise of Atlantis, so do the Asian-origins speculators find their own lost continent had a hand in shaping the rise of Mesoamerican civilization. Writing after the demise of Donnelly's Atlantis theories, Col. James Churchward declared in 1930 the fabulous land of Mu was a Pacific continent greater than Atlantis, and that Central America was but a colony of this great land. While Tompkins (1976:372) believes that the Mu myth could explain the origins of Mesoamerican civilization, Churward's "word can only be taken by those who wish to believe him." Without evidence to back up his claims, Churchward's theory of a lost continent fell to the dustbin of history, though the idea of trans-Pacific voyages did not.

    Michael Coe (2001a:57) mentions that "the possibility of some trans-Pacific influence on Mesoamerican cultures cannot, however, be so easily dismissed." The Asian-influence hypothesis has a stronger basis in fact than its African competitor, though there is still precious little to go on.

    The strongest, and indeed only hard piece of evidence for trans-Pacific contact is the use of a particular technique for the manufacture of bark paper, common to China, Southeast Asia, Indonesia and Mesoamerica. Coe (2001a:58) says that knowledge of this paper-making method "was diffused from eastern Indonesia to Mesoamerica at a very early date." He further argues that since bark paper was used to make books, information may have been exchanged between Pacific and Mesoamerican peoples. This seems to accord with Tompkin's (1976:353) version of ancient Chinese records, which he claims document a transoceanic voyage between China and Mesoamerica in the fifth century A.D. Yet even if true, this would provide no evidence for Asian influence, since Olmec civilization sprang into being around 1500 B.C. (Soustelle 1985:31) and Maya civilization was well into its Classic Period greatness centuries before the supposed voyage (Coe 2001b: 82). However, Tompkins (1976:353) claimed earlier connection between China and Mesoamerica around the twenty-third century B.C. He was forced to concede, however, that since "there are no known historical records for such early periods... these stories float in a limbo between fact and fiction [Tompkins 1976:354]."

    Both Asia and America seemed to share a penchant for making mandalas, the drawn or carved circles of divine meditation favored by Hindus and Buddhists. Victor Mansfield (1981:274) says that the Mesoamerican mandalas were of Teotihuacan origin and shared a similar shape and placement in temples to their Asian counterparts. He offers an explanation for the superficial similarity of Mesoamerican "pecked circles" to Asian mandalas: "the pecked circles may serve as calendars [1981:274]" because they have a cross within the circle whose arms tend to point to the direction of solstices and equinoxes. While Mansfield (1981: 274-275) goes on to offer an Jungian interpretation of the way universal psychic forces influenced mandala (and Christian labyrinth) designs, the calendar representation is the most likely, especially when one remembers that the Mesoamericans envisioned the universe in four parts, thus the cross divides the pecked circle into four sections. Of course, to the Asian-origin hypothesis's credit, Asian (especially Chinese) cosmology emphasized a quadripartite universe.


    Evidence of Lemuria or Mu So your just not another Devil Dog you read Churchward as well! Cool!LOL hoorah!

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    A favorite book of mine is Archaeological Fantasies by Garrett G. Fagan, which devotes chapters dealing with this sort of thing, the epistemology of archaeology, its methodology, alternative theories, lost civilizations, and other goodies.
    Last edited by Centro; 01-26-2009 at 01:14 AM.

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    I feel that most of the population of the southern north american, and central american indian tribes came across the great land bridge that stretched between Alaska and Russia. Though I also feel that it is likely that Lemuria was a mid way point between Central america and Asia, which would make it easier to get to meso-america by an ancient boat.

    I feel that Atlantis is real. There are few explanations for the structures that have been found under water, such as the Bimini Road, but I am not sure if the Bimini road wasn't a city wall. which in turn made it easier for the city to flood. The Bimini Road is just outside of the Bermuda Triangle, and the phenomena that happens there, is more than coincidence I believe. I feel that the Triangle is the site of Atlantis. They were a very highly advance civilization is it possible that some of their tech has survived and is still active, which would wreak havoc on sensors in plains and wreck human perceptions making them crash?

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