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Thread: dose any one know what their name means?

  1. #1
    I
    isis Guest

    Default dose any one know what their name means?

    if not you can find it here
    Behind the Name - the Etymology and History of First Names
    i looked up my name and found it interesting take a look and if you want you can post it here.....

  2. #2
    I
    isis Guest

    Default

    here is mine


    Gender: Feminine
    Usage: English
    Pronounced: TREE-nə [key]
    Short form of CATRINA
    CATRINA
    Gender: Feminine
    Usage: Irish, Scottish
    Variant of CATRIONA
    CATRIONA
    Gender: Feminine
    Usage: Irish, Scottish
    Pronounced: ka-TREE-na, ka-TREE-o-na [key]
    Gaelic form of KATHERINE
    KATHERINE
    Gender: Feminine
    Usage: English
    Pronounced: KATH-ə-rin, KATH-rin [key]
    From the Greek name Αικατερινη (Aikaterine). The etymology is debated: it could derive from the earlier Greek name ‘Εκατερινη (Hekaterine), which came from ‘εκατερος (hekateros) "each of the two"; it could derive from the name of the goddess HECATE; it could be related to Greek αικια (aikia) "torture"; or it could be from a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name". In the early Christian era it became associated with Greek καθαρος (katharos) "pure", and the Latin spelling was changed from Katerina to Katharina to reflect this.
    The name was borne a semi-legendary 4th-century saint and martyr from Alexandria who was tortured on a spiked wheel. The saint was initially venerated in Syria, and the name was introduced to Western Europe by returning crusaders. It has been common in England since the 12th century in many different spellings, with Katherine and Catherine becoming standard in the later Middle Ages.
    Famous bearers of the name include Catherine of Siena, a 14th-century mystic, and Catherine de' Medici, a 16th-century French queen. It was also borne by three of Henry VIII's wives, including Katherine of Aragon, and by two empresses of Russia, including Catherine the Great.

  3. #3
    L
    Lady Dunsany Guest

    Default

    THIS IS ALL THEY WOULD GIVE ME.


    TAYLOR

    Gender: Masculine & Feminine

    Usage: English

    Pronounced: TAY-lər [key]
    From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French taillur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
    Last edited by Lady Dunsany; 01-29-2009 at 01:08 PM.

  4. #4
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    JOHN
    Gender: Masculine

    Usage: English, Biblical

    Pronounced: JAHN (English) [key]

    English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints. The first was John the Baptist, a Jewish ascetic who was considered the forerunner of Jesus Christ. The second was the apostle John, who was also supposedly the author of the fourth Gospel and Revelation.
    This name was initially more common among Eastern Christians in the Byzantine Empire, but it flourished in Western Europe after the First Crusade. In England it became extremely popular: during the later Middle Ages it was given to approximately a fifth of all English boys.

    The name (in various spellings) has been borne by 21 popes and eight Byzantine emperors, as well as rulers of England, France, Sweden, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Bulgaria, Russia and Hungary. It was also borne by the poet John Milton (1608-1674), philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), American founding father and president John Adams (1735-1826), and poet John Keats (1795-1821). Famous bearers of the 20th century include author John Steinbeck (1902-1968), assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963), and musician John Lennon (1940-1980).

    hmm quite an intresting site thanks for this one.

  5. #5
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    Default

    mine translates as "shield wolf", which is much better'n anything i could have hoped.

  6. #6
    H
    Harlock Guest

    Default

    STEVEN

    Gender: Masculine

    Usage: English

    Pronounced: STEEV-ən [key]
    Medieval variant of STEPHEN. The filmmaker Steven Spielberg (1946-), director of 'E.T.' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer of this name.


    and for the root name

    STEPHEN

    Gender: Masculine

    Usage: English, Biblical

    Pronounced: STEEV-ən (English), STEF-ən (English) [key]
    From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament, and he is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.

    This was the name of kings of England, Serbia, and Poland, as well as ten popes. It was also borne by the first Christian king of Hungary (10th century), who is regarded as the patron saint of that country. More recent bearers include British physicist Stephen Hawking (1942-) and the American author Stephen King (1947-)

    couldnt find a etymology of Harlock though ive found it has a prussian origin

  7. #7
    O
    Odin Guest

    Default

    Gender: Masculine

    Usage: Scottish, English

    Pronounced: BROOS [key]
    From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland. It has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.

  8. #8
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    Default

    If I may just add these thoughts to this thread:

    There is a difference between a person's name acting as a label and a person's true name.

    At the heart of all the lost traditions was the teaching of the power of the WORD.
    Every society, tradition and religion used the secret arts of sound, music and words to teach, heal and enlighten.

    The ancient God names are specific signals that can be used to call upon aspects of the one divine force throughout the Universe. They represent manifestations of the divine within our Universe.

    The oldest of these traditions is the Kemetic religion of ancient Egypt.
    It has always taught that to know someone's name is to have power over them.

    A well known story is one about Aset (Isis) who learns the true name of Amon and thus has power over Him and uses Heka to retrieve her husband Wesir (Osiris) from the Underworld. (allegory for Spiritual Rebirth?)

    It is also known that the Universe and everything in it was begun with 'The Divine Utterance' 'The Word' which I see as the Primordial Vibration from which everything was put into motion by.

    In Hindu cosmology, the name of a thing is actually a vital key to understanding its inner nature.

    To quote from Sufi Hazrat Inyat Khan:
    "There is a great secret hidden in name . . . All mystery is hidden in name . . . the meaning of name plays an important part in man's life, and the sound, the vowels, the rhythm, number of the letters which compose it, the mystical numbers, symbol and planet, as well as the root from which it is derived, all disclose their secret."

  9. #9
    I
    isis Guest

    Default

    sorry i jest thought it was weard that my name ment this but i did not mean for you to take affence i was jest sharing this if any feels that they dont care to post the by all means do but if others not want to post then they dont have to..... i jest thought it weard cause my parents gave me this name and i did not know what it ment so i looked it up and came to the web page but i jest wanted to know.... i know my dad is Syrian so it is weard to me that my name came from Syria and my mom is scots irish and i jest thought it was weard that my name also came from Irish, Scottish. i dont know my family background cause my family is keeping it scerat... but i wanted to know what my name ment and i aske for permishion befor posting this... and i am sorry....

  10. #10
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    Default

    Sorry for what, Isis? You pointed me an informative site and i liked it. So did a lot of other people. We do not think you are fishing for information so you can have power over anyone like that OTHER Isis did.


    People keep changing thoughout thier lives. I think eveyone should change their name every ten years or so, because we are not the same people we were. That psychotic fourth grader had nothing in common with the pudgy twit that i was in college, who is not me as i am today, either. Certainly we can get new titles ("Lord Magistrate of Colorado" has a nice ring to it) but i look back twenty years and wonder why that idiot got to use my name. At least with on-line handles we can do this easily.

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